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New Mission screens John Carpenter’s sci-fi classic ‘The Thing’ in 70mm

It’s not a stretch to suggest that the Christian Nyby/Howard Hawks chiller “The Thing From Another World” is among the 10 most important science fiction films of all time, helping essentially create science fiction [Read entire story]

UNAFF film festival focuses on democracy, human rights with ‘Finding Snowden’

It didn’t escape filmmaker Flore Vasseur’s notice that to make her documentary about saving democracy, she had to go to Moscow. “Yes, the irony is to have a discussion on democracy in Russia,” [Read entire story]

‘Wasted! The Story of Food Waste’ both sobering, uplifting

You can call the statistics stomach-churning: •40 percent of all food is wasted in the United States at a cost of a trillion dollars a year, and one-third is wasted worldwide; •10 [Read entire story]

Boris Karloff as Frankenstein monster is highlight of Halloween month

None of us asked to be born. None of us asked to be created in a mad scientist’s laboratory, either. The October movie calendar is filled with the usual bevy of horror films: Serial [Read entire story]

Eileen Chang’s ‘Long Live the Missus’ part of Chinese classic films at BAMPFA

You might have seen the most famous recent adaptation of an Eileen Chang novel, Ang Lee’s excellent World War II spy drama “Lust, Caution.” But there have been Chinese-language adaptations of Chang’s work since [Read entire story]

Japanese internment camp documentary draws parallels to Muslim travel ban

What does the internment of Japanese Americans have to do with the Trump administration’s proposed travel ban? Plenty, as filmmakers Abby Ginzberg and Ken Schneider point out in their new documentary, “And Then They [Read entire story]

Tobe Hooper, RIP: ‘Texas Chainsaw Massacre’ is midnight movie at Clay in SF

It is hard to overestimate the influence of “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” as one of the great low-budget horror films of all time. Made in Texas by Austin born-and-raised college professor and [Read entire story]

12th annual SF Shorts festival at the Roxie has 37 films from 16 countries

A photographer who candidly confronts his diagnosis of ALS head-on. A guy in Los Angeles who takes the food truck model and adapts it to vinyl, running a mobile record truck. A dystopian animated film from China. [Read entire story]

Castro’s ‘I Wake Up Dreaming’ noir festival full of fear, paranoia

Methought I heard a voice cry, “Sleep no more! Macbeth does murder sleep” — the innocent sleep, Sleep that knits up the raveled sleave of care, The death of each day’s life, sore labor’s bath, Balm of hurt [Read entire story]

From ‘Vertigo’ to ‘Body Parts,’ films based on Boileau-Narceja at Castro

They wrote the spectacularly creepy “D’entre les morts” (“From Among the Dead”). You know it as the film “Vertigo,” with Alfred Hitchcock switching the setting from France to San Francisco. But Pierre [Read entire story]

BAMPFA’s Chantal Akerman series begins with ‘Jeanne Dielman’

“I can defend every single shot in that movie,” Chantal Akerman once said of “Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce 1080 Bruxelles,” her three-hour, 20-minute movie about a housewife (Delphine Seyrig) spending her [Read entire story]

BAMPFA’s Chantal Akerman series begins with ‘Jeanne Dielman’

“I can defend every single shot in that movie,” Chantal Akerman once said of “Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce 1080 Bruxelles,” her three-hour, 20-minute movie about a housewife (Delphine Seyrig) spending her [Read entire story]

‘School Life’: gentle documentary of a year at an Irish boarding school

John and Amanda Leyden have been married since 1972, and for all of that time they have been teachers. And not just teachers who instruct, but those who nurture young minds, giving the kind of individual attention to [Read entire story]

‘School Life’: gentle documentary of a year at an Irish boarding school

John and Amanda Leyden have been married since 1972, and for all of that time they have been teachers. And not just teachers who instruct, but those who nurture young minds, giving the kind of individual attention to [Read entire story]

‘Brad’s Status’ is Ben Stiller at his truthful, midlife-crisis best

Midlife crises of white, affluent, whiny men have been a longtime staple of cinema, but “Brad’s Status,” in which Ben Stiller is a Sacramento nonprofit founder accompanying his high school son on an East Coast [Read entire story]

Karen Allen on ‘Year by the Sea,’ directing and ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark’

Before we chat about Karen Allen’s new film, let’s get this out of the way: She is hoping to be a part of “Indiana Jones” part 5. “I’m imagining we’ll know within the next year,” Allen [Read entire story]

‘Rebel in the Rye’: Fan’s warm portrait of enigmatic author J.D. Salinger

“Rebel in the Rye” attempts to understand a man who didn’t want to be understood, made by a writer-director who is clearly a fan. This can have its drawbacks — it’s hard to attain some level [Read entire story]

Truffaut’s ‘Jules and Jim’ anchors Jeanne Moreau tribute at Castro Theatre

There will surely be a more comprehensive tribute to the great Jeanne Moreau, who died on July 31 at 89. Clearing calendar space and booking rarely screened classics in bulk are a daunting task, so for now the Castro [Read entire story]

James Baldwin’s view of cinema on display at BAMPFA series

You are not imagining things: There is indeed a screening of a 1942 Bette Davis-Olivia de Havilland film in the Berkeley Art Museum Pacific Film Archive series “Reflection and Resistance: James Baldwin and Cinema.” [Read entire story]

2nd Annual Wes Ander-thon screens all 8 films at Roxie Theater

Last year’s Wes Ander-thon, a screening of all eight films directed by Wes Anderson, proved so popular that MidNites for Maniacs and Spoke Art are bringing back the weekend series for another go. [Read entire story]